Keynote Speakers

Vice rector Science, Engineering and Technology Group KU Leuven,

Dept. Elektrotechniek ESAT-MICAS Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, Room B02.03 B-3001 LEUVEN, Belgium

KU Leuven, Belgium

E-mail:Gielen@esat.kuleuven.be

Presentation Title:

Design of low-power sensor interfaces in the IoT era

Abstract:

Growing application areas such as the Internet of Things, biomedical and automotive introduce an increasing demand for distributed sensors and sensor nodes. Such nodes are characterized by tough requirements in terms of low energy consumption, absolute robustness and secure communication. This talk will focus on the design of low-energy and low-cost integrated sensor interface circuits. The fundamental limitations of both voltage-based and time-based solutions will be discussed and compared, and new architectures will be introduced that convert sensor signals directly into digital output for both capacitive and resistive sensors. Practical design examples will illustrate the design solutions.

_______________________________________________

PhD, Milton Kerker Chaired Professor of Colloid Science
Chemistry & Biomolecular Science
145 Science Center
Clarkson University
PO Box 5810
Potsdam, NY 13699-5810

E-mail: ekatz@clarkson.edu Phone: 315-268-4421

Presentation Title:

Implantable Biofuel Cells Operating In Vivo – Potential Power Sources for Bioelectronic Devices

Abstract:

Implantable devices harvesting energy from biological sources and based on electrochemical transducers are currently receiving high attention. The energy collected from the body can be utilized to activate various microelectronic devices. This talk is an overview of the recent research activity in the area of enzyme-based biofuel cells implanted in biological tissue and operating in vivo. The electrical power extracted from the biological sources presents use for activating microelectronic devices for biomedical applications. While some microelectronic devices can work within a fairly broad range of electrical operating conditions, others, such as pacemakers, require precise voltage levels and voltage regulation for correct operation. Thus, certain classes of electronic devices powered by implantable energy sources will require careful attention not only to energy and power considerations, but also to voltage scaling and regulation. This requires appropriate interfacing between the energy harvesting device and the energy consuming microelectronic device. The talk focuses on the problems in the present technology as well as offers their potential solutions. Lastly, perspectives and future applications of the implanted biofuel cells will be also discussed. The considered examples include a pacemaker and a wireless signal transfer system powered by implantable biofuel cell extracting electrical energy from biological sources.

_______________________________________________

Donald O. Pederson Distinguished Professor, Dept. of EECS

University of California at Berkeley, CA, USA

 

e-mail:jan@eecs.berkeley.edu

Presentation Title:

Brain-Machine Interfaces - The Core of the Human Intranet

 

_______________________________________________

PhD, Senior Director of Core Technology, Technical Fellow,Medtronic Neuromoduation

7000 Central Avenue North,
Minneapolis-St. Paul, USA

 

e-mail: timothy.denison@medtronic.com

Presentation Title:

Creating Windows into the Brain

Abstract:

The burden of neurological disease represents a large unmet need with significant societal and economic impact. While promising in-roads for treatment have been made for some conditions, the application of medical technology to address the broader space neurological disorders is often limited by the lack of understanding of the natural pathophysiology, and, in particular, the response of a diseased neural circuit to existing and potential treatments. Technologists are helping to address this issue by creating translational research tools for neuroscientists, permitting the chronic probing of diseased circuits. Working together, the hope is that clinicians, scientists and engineers can then use these “windows into the brain” to build up therapeutic concepts from scientific and engineering first-principles. To help make these systems practical, several constraints must be considered in order to achieve the scientific goals of the research team while balancing the risks and benefits of the system from the patient’s perspective. Our goal is to help catalyze an ecosystem of translational research merging engineering design methods with basic neuroscience to explore the next generation of therapies to treat neurological disorders.

_______________________________________________

Senior Engineer at CERN - Physics Department (PH)

CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

 

e-mail:michael.campbell@cern.ch

Presentation Title:

Tiling of large area X‐ray detectors with Medipix3 and charged particle tracking within a semiconductor sensor with Timepix3

Abstract:

M. Campbell (1), R. Ballabriga (1), J. Alozy (1), E. Frojdh (1),(2), E.H.M. Heijne (4), X. Llopart (1), T. Poikela (1),(3), L.Tlustos (1), P. Valerio (1) and W.Wong (1)

1) CERN, Geneva Switzerland
2) Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden
3) Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, FI‐20014 Turun yliopisto, Finland
4) Institute of Applied and Experimental Physics, CTU, Prague, Czech Republic

Medipix3 is a hybrid pixel detector readout chip suited to high resolution X-ray imaging at high speed and providing up to 8 energy channels. The chip can be connected to sensors (of Si, CdTe, GaAs or Ge) with pixel pitches of 55um or 110um. An on‐pixel charge summing and allocation circuit mitigates the effects of fluorescence and charge diffusion in the sensor while retaining spatial resolution. Large area detectors are becoming available commercially.
Recent measurements on samples processed using Through Silicon Via technology point the way towards seamless large area tiling. The Timepix3 chip adopts the approach of sending all hit information off chip.
Charge amplitude, hit pixel coordinates and a time stamp which is measured with a precision of 1.6ns are sent off-chip each time a pixel is hit.
The chip can deal with a hit rate of 80MHz/cm2/sec. The device can be used for spectroscopic X‐ray imaging at moderate count rates and for charged particle tracking within a semiconductor sensor.

_______________________________________________

Research Director INFN - section of Genova

INFN, Genova, Italy

 

 

e-mail:leonardo.rossi@ge.infn.it

Presentation Title:

Hybrid pixel detectors at the Large Hadron Collider: past and future

Abstract:

Hybrid pixel detectors have been used as vertex detectors in most of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. Their truly 3D hit information, together with their efficiency, speed and radiation resistance make them ideal to reconstruct track and vertices in the harsh environment surrounding the LHC interaction regions. Many technological challenges have been overcome to build those devices according to the specifications of the LHC experiments. Some of the key challenges will be briefly described together with the most significant results obtained with these hybrid pixel detectors. The success of this technology opens the way to larger and more sophisticated vertex detectors for the LHC upgrade program. The main developments underway for pixel detectors in this upgrade program will also be presented.

 

_______________________________________________

Chair of Electronic Systems at the University of Glasgow

Scotland, UK

 

 

Presentation Title:

Hybridising Photonic and Biotechnologies to CMOS

_______________________________________________

Imec, Belgium

 

 

 

Presentation Title:

Wearable Health Solutions: technologies for cure, care and prevention

_____________________________________________

PhD, Prof. at the Dept. Of Bioelectronics, Ecole des Mines de St. Etienne

Centre Microélectronique de Provence in Gardanne, France

 

 

e-mail: owens@emse.fr

Presentation Title:

Organic electronic devices for label-free monitoring of in vitro toxicology

Presentation Summary:

Electronic methods for label-free monitoring of cells in vitro are emerging as alternatives to traditional, optical methods. Organic electronic devices offer an opportunity to create low-cost, whole cell biosensors, with applications in drug development, toxicology monitoring or diagnostics.

Abstract:

Organic bioelectronics refers to the coupling of conducting polymer based devices with biological systems, in an effort to bridge the biotic/abiotic interface. We focus on the unique properties of organic electronic materials that allow easy fabrication, and flexibility in design as well as chemical tunability, to develop state-of-the-art tools to (1) monitor cells i.e. for diagnostic purposes following exposure to toxins or pathogens and (2) control cells, for example to create more ‘in vivo’ like environments. We work not only with commercially available materials, but are also optimizing custom materials for use in devices by changing morphology, adding biomolecules to increase biocompatibility, and incorporating biorecognition elements directly into the materials. Our goal is to develop physiologically relevant in vitro systems with integrated monitoring systems that obviate the need for animal experimentation in diagnostics, toxicology or drug development. To this end, we have successfully demonstrated the use of the organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) for monitoring toxicology in in vitro models of the gastrointestinal tract, the kidney and the blood brain barrier. We show improved temporal resolution and sensitivity compared to existing techniques, and further, take advantage of the flexibility of design and fabrication of organic electronic devices to include microfluidics, optical monitoring and multiplex acquisition systems.

_______________________________________________

Associate Professor, Electronic Instrumentation Laboratory Delft

University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

 

 

e-mail:M.A.P.Pertijs@tudelft.nl

Presentation Title:

Low-Power Receive Electronics for a Miniature Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Probe

Abstract:

Visualization of the human heart is critical for the accurate diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Compared with other cardiac imaging techniques, echocardiography is more cost-effective and capable of providing real-time images. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) uses the esophagus as the imaging window to the human heart. In TEE, an ultrasound transducer array is used that is mounted at the tip of an endoscope which is swallowed by the patient. In the conventional approach, each transducer element is wired-out by a micro-coaxial cable to an external imaging system. However, in order to obtain real-time 3D images, a two-dimensional matrix array with more than 1000 transducers elements is required. Direct wiring of so many elements through an endoscope is not feasible, so channel reduction should be performed locally. In this paper, we present a front-end application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that includes low-noise amplifiers, programmable-gain amplifiers and micro-beamformer circuits that locally process and combine the signals received by sub-groups of the transducer array. Thus, an order-of-magnitude channel reduction is achieved. We also present an integration technique by means of which a transducer array can be directly mounted on top of the ASIC. Acoustic characterization of the prototype ASIC with co-integrated transducer array will be presented.

_______________________________________________

Professor at the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department

University of California in Berkeley, USA

 

 

e-mail: acarias@eecs.berkeley.edu

Presentation Title:

Flexible Printed Electronics for Vital Signs Monitoring

Abstract:

Yasser Khan, Claire Lochner, Adrien Pierre and Ana Claudia Arias

Significant progress in the performance of printable materials has been reported including highly efficient solar cells, light emitting diodes and thin film transistors with mobilities as high as 10 cm2/Vs. The research is highly motivated by the potential for high throughput, high volume, low cost manufacturing. While large area electronics continues to be a valid application for printed flexible devices, wearable medical devices, which benefit from new form factors, represent a great shift in direction of research in the field. The minimal functionality desired for wearable medical devices requires monitoring of vital signs such as ECG, temperature, blood oxygenation, pulse rate, blood pressure and respiration rate. We have developed methods to measure blood oxygenation, bio impedance and temperature using fully printed devices as building blocks for flexible wearable sensing systems. We have shown that surface energy modification and blade coating yields highly homogeneous flexible thin films that are applied to LEDS, photodiodes and TFTs, whereas inkjet printing and screen-printing are suitable for conducting lines and electrode arrays. We have successfully implemented solution processed red (626 nm) and green (532 nm) light emitting diodes made from polyfluorene blends in an all-organic optoelectronic pulse oximeter sensor. The red and green OLEDs operate at 9 V, 1 kHz, and alternately transmit light through a human index finger. The transmitted light is sensed by an organic photodetector on the opposite side of the finger. Biopotential electrodes are inkjet-printed using gold nanoparticle ink where minimum feature size of 80 µm was achieved with a sheet resistance of 0.4 Ω/sq. Thermistors are inkjet-printed using a blend of PEDOT:PSS and nickel oxide nanoparticles. Printed thermistors provide linear response from 25 °C to 150 °C with a controllable β of 500 to 1000. Finally, the sensors were interfaced with an analog front-end, a microcontroller, and a Bluetooth chip, to provide ECG signal and accurate body temperature.

_______________________________________________